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Talent: A Two-Part Series - Part I. The Currency of the 21st Century Economic Developer - Part II. Identifying, Implementing, & Funding Organizational Solutions

August 20, 2017View for printing

Part I. The Currency of the 21st Century Economic Developer

For more than 30 years I've had the opportunity to assist communities with their development goals and have witnessed first-hand the profound changes affecting economies in rural America, suburbia, and major metropolitan statistical areas (MSAs). Whether it's rural agriculture towns like Henderson, Kentucky, blue-collar to white-collar transitional cities like Roanoke, Virginia, tourism-centric communities like Daytona Beach, Florida, university-driven towns like Athens, Georgia, or major MSAs like Atlanta, Georgia, no economy has remained immune to the immutable law of capitalism known as profit.

How companies generate profit and how communities play a vital role in that goal is the purpose of this commentary. Without profitable businesses, communities lose jobs, wealth, taxes, and families.

By Lawrence McKinney, CEcD, CCE, IOM

Full Story: https://www.convergentnonprofit.com/w ... edium=email

Part II. Identifying, Implementing, & Funding Organizational Solutions

Since 1986, Area Development Magazine has polled corporate executives and site selection consultants and every year, until now, the top consideration for industry has been "Highway Accessibility." Although "Availability of Skilled Labor" has always been a top contender, it wasn't until 2016 that it finally replaced highway accessibility.

If you are a community organization leader, you can no longer afford to wait on those in education and government to figure out how to grow your skilled talent base. Chicagoland is an excellent example of this vexing issue. During the past five years, over 60 companies have relocated their headquarters to the area, including most recently Caterpillar, citing the need for skilled labor. Many companies can no longer wait on communities that don't understand the critical skills gap and have decided instead to relocate their operations to where the skilled talent pool already exists.

This article provides a blueprint for your community to not only understand your labor market and potential skills gap, but also "how" and "why" it is necessary to secure funding to address it.

By Lawrence McKinney, CEcD, CCE, IOM

Full Story: https://www.convergentnonprofit.com/w ... edium=email
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